Monday, October 15, 2012

sar -r



I read this on page 970 of the book advertised above. You can see the amount of free memory and swap space on a server as follows: 

Solaris > sar -r 5 4
 
SunOS yfd-ljsqdc-cca1 5.10 Generic_142900-15 sun4u    10/15/2012
 
17:33:09 freemem freeswap
17:33:14 2282983 145529158
17:33:19 2282920 145519952
17:33:24 2284281 145554707
17:33:29 2285210 145576483
 
Average  2283848 145545075
Solaris > 

So, if the server has 21 open databases: 

Solaris > ps -ef|grep pmon|wc -l
      21
Solaris >

... and you open another one: 

Solaris > sqlplus / as sysdba
 
SQL*Plus: Release 11.2.0.2.0 Production on Mon Oct 15 17:34:33 2012
 
Copyright (c) 1982, 2010, Oracle.  All rights reserved.
 
Connected to an idle instance.
 
SQL> startup
ORACLE instance started.
 
Total System Global Area  522092544 bytes
Fixed Size                  2159904 bytes
Variable Size             314575584 bytes
Database Buffers          197132288 bytes
Redo Buffers                8224768 bytes
Database mounted.
Database opened.
SQL> exit
Disconnected from Oracle Database 11g Enterprise Edition Release 11.2.0.2.0 - 64bit Production
With the Partitioning, OLAP, Data Mining and Real Application Testing options 
Solaris > 

... you will have 22 open databases: 

Solaris > ps -ef|grep pmon|wc -l
      22
Solaris > 

Then, if you run the sar command again, the available memory and swap space will be lower: 

Solaris > sar -r 5 4
 
SunOS yfd-ljsqdc-cca1 5.10 Generic_142900-15 sun4u    10/15/2012
 
17:35:21 freemem freeswap
17:35:26 2182124 143973616
17:35:31 2181901 143735869
17:35:36 2185627 144082067
17:35:41 2188363 144147203
 
Average  2184391 143984162
Solaris >

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